Young people drive toward Baltimore riot police honking their horns and raising their hands with peace signs the night after city riots.  (Photo: Mark Makela, Getty Images)
Young people drive toward Baltimore riot police honking their horns and raising their hands with peace signs the night after city riots. (Photo: Mark Makela, Getty Images)

Darrell McGraw was walking out of a Baltimore City convenience store when he was pushed to the ground by police, with very little explanation given, he says.  He was kicked, slapped, punched.  He was interrogated all for what he says was mistaken identity. The coverage of his treatment was negligible. And he thinks that often when news organizations do venture into his Baltimore City neighborhood, it’s to report something negative about himself and other black men who look and live like him. Is he right? What could journalists do better? What biases and issues do we carry with us when covering stories about race, and could our efforts be part of the problem?

We tell McGraw’s story, get his views on police treatment and news coverage, talk to media scholars and host a series of roundtable discussions about race and media in the podcast below.  Listen, then voice your view.  On Twitter use #policingtheusa.  Or call 540-739-2928 to leave a voice message. What do you think the media should be doing better when it comes to covering issues of race? What does success look like?