Four-year veteran of the Prince George's County, Md. police force Jacai Colson was killed by friendly fire. (Photo: Prince George's County Police Department via AP)
Four-year veteran of the Prince George’s County, Md. police force Jacai Colson was killed by friendly fire. (Photo: Prince George’s County Police Department via AP)

Last updated 9:44 p.m., March 17, 2016

Undercover police officer viewed as threat

An unidentified officer shot and killed Prince George’s County Police Officer Jacai Colson on March 14, stating that he did not realize Colson, who is black, was a cop and that he perceived him to be threatening. Colson, 28, was a narcotics detective in suburban Washington D.C. More information below:

Undercover Md. officer viewed as threat, ‘deliberately’ shot

Police: Cop in Md. ambush killed by friendly fire

VIDEO: Maryland police officer killed in shooting

Two Baltimore officers charged in student assault
Video showing officer beating teen went viral

Two Baltimore school police officers were charged with second-degree assault and misconduct in office after a video showing one of them slapping a student went viral. The video shows Anthony Spence hitting and kicking a teen while Saverna Bias watches. Warrants for their arrests were issued March 8, and the officers turned themselves in. Find more about the case in the links below.

Baltimore school police officers charged with assault, misconduct in incident on video

Video: Baltimore City schools police officer slaps a young man

Texas trooper in Sandra Bland case fired
Sandra Bland (Photo: Family photo via AP)
Sandra Bland (Photo: Family photo via AP)

Brian Encinia, the Texas state trooper who arrested Sandra Bland in July after a routine traffic stop escalated, was formally dismissed March 1. Encinia, who has been indicted on perjury charges in the case, can appeal the decision to the Texas Public Safety Commission. Bland was found hanging in her cell three days after being taken into custody. Her death has been ruled a suicide. Find more information below.

Texas trooper who arrested Sandra Bland formally fired

Trooper in Bland case surrenders to Texas Rangers

Texas trooper indicted in Sandra Bland case faces dismissal

Facebook staff deface BLM message
Employees are encouraged to leave messages on the Facebook wall. Here, the wall in the New York office. (Photo: Mary Altaffer, AP)
Employees are encouraged to leave messages on the Facebook wall. Here, the wall in the New York office. (Photo: Mary Altaffer, AP)
Zuckerberg reacts to employees who cross out phrase

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg called the actions of employees who defaced the “Black Lives Matter” motto that had been written on the walls of its Menlo Park, Calif., offices a “deeply hurtful and tiresome experience for the black community.”

Employees are encouraged to write messages on walls, like the one pictured above.

After employees crossed out the phrase “Black Lives Matter” and wrote in its place “All Lives Matter,” Zuckerberg re-iterated in an internal message that while there aren’t rules dictating what people can or can’t write, the company expects “everybody to treat each other with respect.”

Facebook has offices in New York and California and only 2% of its employees are black. For more, see below:

Zuckerberg reprimands Facebook staff defacing ‘Black Lives Matter’

Police urged not to volunteer for Beyoncé concert
Beyoncé performs during Super Bowl 50's halftime show on Feb. 7, 2016. (Photo: Harry How, Getty Images)
Beyoncé performs during Super Bowl 50’s halftime show on Feb. 7, 2016. (Photo: Harry How, Getty Images)
Nashville union objects to singer’s message

Nashville’s police union, which represents 1,600 full-time and retired officers, issued a statement Feb. 19 urging its members not to volunteer to work at Beyoncé’s concert at Nissan Stadium on May 15. Sgt. Danny Hale, president of the Nashville Fraternal Order of Police, said the singer promotes anti-policing sentiments. Beyoncé’s performance during the Super Bowl halftime show drew criticism, including from former New York mayor Rudy Giuliani, because it alluded to the Black Panthers. Nashville Police Chief Steve Anderson said the police department is required to staff major events to ensure public safety. If not enough police officers volunteer for the event, which requires about 88 officers, then officers will be assigned, Anderson said. Read more in the links below.

Nashville police union: Don’t volunteer for Beyoncé concert

VIDEO: Police vote to boycott Beyonce concert

Officer cites Beyoncé video in shooting

sheriffhome

Several shots fired at sheriff’s home

A Tennessee sheriff told his wife and children to duck after he heard eight shots fired into his Murfreesboro home the evening of Feb. 15. Rutherford County Sheriff Robert Arnold said he saw a dark gray Nissan Altima drive drive past his home, and that he had been on the phone when he heard the shots fired.  During a Feb. 16 news conference, he questioned whether a recent video released by popular singer Beyoncé could have inspired the shooting.

The singer has come under attack recently after a Super Bowl halftime performance during which she and her backup dancers wore Black Panther-inspired costumes and danced to her single Formation. Former New York City mayor Rudy Giuliani said he thought the performance was inappropriate and “attacked” cops. More information in the link below:

Sheriff cites Beyoncé video after shots fired at his home

State trooper charged after kicking man in face

A Pennsylvania state trooper was arrested and charged Feb. 12 with police brutality after kicking a handcuff man in the face hard enough to cause the man to recoil, according to an affidavit. The incident happened in May after State Trooper Ryan Luckenbaugh arrested skateboarder Chris Siennick. Police say Siennick spit at them and threw something at their vehicle.  Siennick denies being aggressive with police, but says that he made a rude gesture toward police after they drove by and yelled insulting comments at him. Luckehbaugh’s partner was fired last year. More information below:

State trooper arrested, charged in police brutality case 

DOJ sues Ferguson
Ferguson Mayor James Knowles (Photo: David Carson, AP)
Ferguson Mayor James Knowles (Photo: David Carson, AP)
City rejects agreement citing costs

The Department of Justice announced Feb. 10, that it will sue Ferguson, Mo., after the City Council rejected its negotiated settlement with the department, stating that it would cost $10 million to implement over the next three years. Mayor James Knowles defended the council decision to remove language from the agreement that, according to city leaders, mandates raises for police officers. More from Knowles and Attorney General Loretta Lynch below:

Feds sue Ferguson to force police reform

#BLM activist commits suicide at Ohio Statehouse

The motive behind MarShawn McCarrel II’s death is unclear, but the activist’s body was found with an apparent self-inflicted gun-shot wound around 6 p.m. on Feb. 8 at the top of the building’s West rotunda steps. A few hours before his death, McCarrel, 23,  posted on Facebook: “My demons won today. I’m sorry.” The Ohio police department is investigating the incident. More information below:

Black Lives Matter activist commits suicide on Ohio Statehouse steps

Chicago cop files countersuit against teen
Antonio LeGrier, right, the father of Quintonio LeGrier, stands with family at his the funeral of his son in Chicago on Jan. 9, 2016. EPA/TANNEN MAURY ORG XMIT: THM14
Antonio LeGrier, right, the father of Quintonio LeGrier, stands with family at his son’s funeral in Chicago on Jan. 9, 2016. (Photo: Tannen Maury, epa)
Officer killed 19-year-old student, neighbor

Chicago police officer Robert Rialmo fatally shot Quintonio LeGrier, 19, and Bettie Jones, 55, on Dec. 26 while responding to a call about a domestic disturbance.  Rialmo says he was forced to shoot LeGrier, a college student, because LeGrier swung a baseball bat at Rialmo’s head and failed to follow orders to drop the bat. The lawsuit, filed on Feb. 5, states the shooting has caused “extreme emotional trauma” to Rialmo, who is seeking $50,000 and $10 million in damages from the teen’s estate. Read more below.

Chicago police officer files countersuit against teen he shot

Report finds discrepancies in drug cases
Annie Dookhan appears in court Jan. 9, 2013, in Dedham, Mass.
Annie Dookhan appears in court Jan. 9, 2013, in Dedham, Mass.
But Independent tests verify most of lab’s results

Despite inconsistent lab protocols at the now-shuttered Hinton State Drug Laboratory in Massachusetts, a months-long independent investigation found no widespread testing inaccuracies, according to a Feb. 2 report.  However, some discrepancies surfaced. Over 18 months, an out-of-state lab tested 609 drug samples. In 551 cases, the same substance that the Hinton lab certified was found. In the cases that returned discrepancies, prosecutors have been alerted. The investigation, conducted by the state inspector general, comes after a lab technician there, Annie Dookhan, was accused of improperly verifying drug tests before declaring them positive in criminal investigations. In 2013, Dookhan pleaded guilty to 27 charges against her, including obstruction of justice, perjury and tampering with evidence. Although the inspector general has said Dookhan was the sole “bad actor” at the lab, the evidence of inconsistent protocols throughout the lab has cast doubt on thousands of cases. More info:

IG finds discrepancies in old Hinton drug cases

Massachusetts Justice Clears Way for New Trials in Cases Chemist May Have Tainted

It’s Time to Clean Up Annie Dookhan’s Drug-Lab Mess

Cop fatally shoots man armed with BB gun
D.C. Police Chief Cathy Lanier
D.C. Police Chief Cathy Lanier (Photo: Manuel Balce Ceneta, AP)
Incident is under internal investigation 

A Washington, D.C., police officer shot and killed a man on Feb. 1 after mistaking a BB gun for a semiautomatic handgun, Police Chief Cathy Lanier said. The officer was chasing the man on foot because he had observed suspicious activity, police said. The man’s weapon appeared when he slipped and fell on the pavement. He reached for the weapon, police say, and after failing to obey a command to stop, the officer shot him in the neck. The fatal police-involved shooting is under internal investigation. According to a local NBC affiliate, the incident marks the fourth deadly police shooting since March in the Northeast Washington neighborhood known for violent crime. It comes less than a week after an auditor released a report stating that excessive use of force by Washington police has remained low over the past decade. Read more in the links below.

Police: Man Killed by DC Officer Had BB Gun

D.C. officer fatally shoots a person armed with BB gun, police say

Excessive force not a problem in the D.C. police force, but issues remain

DOJ to investigate San Francisco police

The Justice Department’s Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) announced Feb. 1 that it will launch a review of the San Francisco Police Department’s training and practices. Officials involved in the COPS investigation are calling the two-year process an effort to rebuild trust between the city’s police and the public. This investigation comes two months after police shot Mario Woods, 26,  after failing to drop a knife he had allegedly used to stab another man. Since the Dec. 2 shooting, protesters in the city have been calling for the resignation of Police Chief Greg Suhr. More information below:

Justice Department to investigate San Francisco police

Hundreds march in SF to protest SFPD’s fatal shooting of Mario Woods

Protesters call for firing of San Francisco police chief

Fatal shooting of man who killed police dog questioned

Police shot and killed a man in a Pittsburgh suburb Jan. 31 after he fatally stabbed a German Shepherd K9 officer. An altercation broke out when officers found Bruce Kelley Jr., 37, and his father, Bruce Kelley Sr., drinking alcohol in a public gazebo. The men ran away. The father was caught quickly. When police found the son, he had a knife. Officers tried to stun him, but he was shot and killed after stabbing the K9 officer, police said. The investigation into the incident is ongoing, and some are asking whether police had the right to use deadly force because a police dog was killed. More information below:

Port Authority K-9 stabbed to death, suspect killed

Was fatal shooting in K-9 case justified? Crimes Code, police manual, outline acceptable use of force

Ferguson police, DOJ reach deal
A protester yells at police outside the Ferguson, Mo., police department. (Photo: Jeff Roberson, AP)
A protester yells at police outside the Ferguson, Mo., police department. (Photo: Jeff Roberson, AP)
Agreement would revise use-of-force policy

Though it still has to be ratified by the Ferguson City Council, the Department of Justice and the Ferguson Police Department have reached a tentative deal that would require more diverse police recruitment, and more emphasis on de-escalating confrontation and avoiding use of force, officials said Jan. 27. The agreement comes after a DOJ examination of the department, sparked by a high-profile case during which a young, unarmed black male, Michael Brown, 18, was shot and killed by a white police officer, Darren Wilson, in August 2014.  The officer left the department but was never indicted for the killing. The Justice investigation found racial bias within the police department, which has very few minority officers in a community that is nearly 70% black. More information below:

Ferguson, Justice reach deal to revamp police operation

Trial starts for N.Y. officer charged in killing
New York Police Department officer Peter Liang arrives at a courtroom in Brooklyn. (Photo: Jewel Samad, AFP/Getty Images)
New York Police Department officer Peter Liang arrives at a courtroom in Brooklyn. (Photo: Jewel Samad, AFP/Getty Images)
Opening arguments show vastly different sides of cop

Opening arguments that began Jan. 25 in the trial of New York police officer Peter Liang call into question the officer’s motivation for shooting and killing Akai Gurley on Nov. 20, 2014, in the Brooklyn housing project called Pink Houses. Painted by the defense as an accident and by the prosecution as a sinister killing, according to a Los Angeles Times report, the shooting happened while Liang was on patrol in the neighborhood.  After he shot Gurley, 28, an unarmed black male, Liang neglected to immediately report the incident, according to the prosecution. He also failed to assist Gurley, whose girlfriend attempted CPR, prosecutors said. If convicted of second-degree manslaughter, Liang could face 15 years in prison.  More information below:

Accident or recklessness? NYPD officer’s trial opens with two versions of killing

New York officer charged in Akai Gurley’s fatal shooting goes on trial

Reports: Grand jury indicts NYPD cop in stairwell killing

Cop’s ‘no bail’ release raises questions of fairness

Tapes released of 911 calls that led to teen being shot, killed

The audio of 911 calls made by a teenager who reported an emergency to dispatchers three times in as many minutes was made public Jan. 25. Quintonio LeGrier, a 19-year-old college student, stepped out of his house holding a baseball bat on Dec. 26 after police arrived. He had reported a life-threatening emergency to dispatchers, but was rebuffed after he refused to give details. Chicago police, who showed up minutes after a fourth call made by LeGrier’s father, killed the student after shooting him six times. They also shot and killed a neighbor, Bettie Jones, who answered a shared front door. Officers apologized for the killing of Jones, which they called an accident. More information, including audio from the 911 calls, below:

Man killed by Chicago police called 911 before being shot

Autopsy shows Chicago cop shot teen six times in Christmas weekend shooting

Department policies enable violence, report says
Students in San Francisco protest the fatal shooting of Mario Woods, which caused the police to review its use-of-force policy. (Photo: Mike Koozmin, San Francisco Examiner via AP)
San Francisco students protest the fatal shooting of Mario Woods, which caused the San Francisco Police Department to review its use-of-force policy. (Photo: Mike Koozmin, San Francisco Examiner via AP)

Review: Some cities don’t require police to de-escalate
A dozen of the 17 police departments reviewed by the Police Use of Force Project — an organization that has assembled an open-source database of police policies — allow officers to shoot at moving vehicles. In addition, less than half of the departments reviewed require officers to stop excessive use of force or report when they have seen other officers use it, the report stated.

The San Francisco Police Department has decided to revamp its 20-year-old use-of-force policy after a recent shooting was caught on camera via cellphone. The revamped policy may include alternatives to guns for officers such as Tasers and shields. Experts discussed recommendations during a hearing Jan. 21. The city’s current policy, according to the Police Use of Force Project, does not require de-escalation. More below:

Police Use of Force Project

San Francisco police to revise use-of-force policy

Calif. family files lawsuit claiming police erased video
An Indio, Calif., police officer is accused of using excessive force during a chase at an apartment complex on Oct. 14. (Photo: Anna Rumer, The (Palm Springs, Calif.) Desert Sun)
An Indio, Calif., police officer is accused of using excessive force during a chase at an apartment complex on Oct. 14. (Photo: Anna Rumer, The (Palm Springs, Calif.) Desert Sun)

The family of Sammy Villarreal, 18, is suing Indio, Calif., stating that an Indio police officer used excessive force when he shot and killed the teenager, and that the police department seized and erased phone and security camera footage of the incident. According to police, Villarreal tried to escape arrest during a car chase in an apartment complex parking lot. They stated that he backed his vehicle into the police car, causing a crash.  According to the family, shooting Villarreal was excessive because there was no one in the path of Villareal’s vehicle when the crash happened. More below:

Lawsuit: Calif. police erased video to cover up shooting

Chicago Police Department to work with civil rights adviser
As the Philadelphia Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey, center, refers to the Justice Department's six-month assessment report. (Photo: Matt Rourke, AP)
As the Philadelphia Police Commissioner, Charles Ramsey, center, refers to the Justice Department’s six-month assessment report. (Photo: Matt Rourke, AP)

Charles H. Ramsey — a former Chicago police deputy superintendent, and the former head of the Washington and Philadelphia police departments — will return to Chicago, this time to reform the department and try to instill public trust in an agency mired in scandal after recent fatal shootings of young black men caught on video. The appointment was announced Jan. 24 from the office of Mayor Rahm Emanuel. Residents have been asking for Emanuel’s resignation since his involvement was revealed in the slow release of a video showing a white cop fatally shooting black teen Laquan McDonald.  More information in the links below:

Mayor Rahm Emanuel taps high-profile officer to advise Chicago police

Chicago hires civil rights adviser for police department

Family to get $4.8M after fatal shooting by cop
Family members of Samuel DuBose, who was fatally shot by a University of Cincinnati officer. (Photo: John Minchillo, AP)
Family members of Samuel DuBose, who was fatally shot by a University of Cincinnati officer. (Photo: John Minchillo, AP)

Ex-officer faces murder charge
The University of Cincinnati announced Jan. 18 that it has agreed to pay the family of Samuel DuBose, who was shot and killed by a campus police officer after being pulled over for a missing a front license plate, $4.8 million. The University will also cover the cost of a college education for all 12 of DuBose’s children — the oldest is 23, the youngest is 4. Ray Tensing, the officer, was fired and has pleaded not guilty in the fatal shooting, which took place off campus on July 19. More in the links below:

DuBose attorney on settlement: ‘They’re not, nor should they be, happy with it’

Sam DuBose video changed everything: Column

University of Cincinnati agrees to pay Samuel DuBose’s family $4.8M

The family Sam DuBose left behind wrestles with its loss

Protests mount against corruption, mayor in Chicago
Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel (Photo: AP)
Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel (Photo: AP)

Chicago demonstrators have called this month for an end to police brutality or the ouster of the city’s Mayor Rahm Emanuel on at least three different occasions. On Jan. 16, more than 100 marched peacefully through city streets to mark Martin Luther King Jr. Day and the 50th anniversary of the Chicago Freedom Movement, and to call for an end to the city’s corruption and police brutality.  On Jan. 15, protesters disrupted the mayor during an annual MLK breakfast to call for the official’s resignation. And on Jan. 7, the Chicago Teachers Union, which has 27,000 members, called for the ouster of Emanuel and Cook County Prosecutor Anita Alvarez for their role in the late release of a video that showed officer Jason Van Dyke shooting and killing black teenager Laquan McDonald. More in links below:

March marks MLK Day, protests police brutality

VIDEO: Chicago protesters disrupt mayor’s MLK event

Chicago Teachers Union calls on mayor to resign over police shooting

Voices: Emanual toughs it out in political ‘hell’

Teen was shot running from Chicago police, videos show
AP CHICAGO POLICE A USA IL
A Chicago police officer is seen aiming his gun at Cedrick Chatman, who is not pictured, on Jan. 7, 2013, in Chicago. (Photo: City of Chicago Law Department via AP)

Videos from three cameras, including a police camera, released Jan. 14 show a Chicago police officer fatally shooting unarmed Cedrick Chatman, 17, in 2013. Chatman, a suspect in a carjacking, is seen running away when he is hit. Officers Kevin Fry and Lou Toth had responded to the carjacking report. Fry has said in a deposition that he thought Chatman was armed, and was turning toward Toth, when Fry fired. Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s administration had fought the release of the footage for months. The two officers and the city of Chicago are being sued by the teen’s mother. Read more in the links below.

Videos show teen running from Chicago cops when he’s shot

New video is released in death of Chicago teen fleeing police

Chicago drops objection to releasing another police shooting video

Philadelphia cop ambushed ‘in the name of Islam,’ police say
Police officers view a surveillance image on Jan. 8, 2016, showing the suspect in a shooting ambush in Philadelphia. (Photo by Mark Makela, Getty Images)
Police officers view a surveillance image on Jan. 8, 2016, showing the suspect in a shooting ambush in Philadelphia. (Photo by Mark Makela, Getty Images)

A Philadelphia cop, wounded in an execution-style ambush, was shot “in the name of Islam,” police said Jan. 8. The suspect, Edward Archer, 30, was arrested soon after the shooting Thursday night. Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney downplayed the connection to Islam in a news conference. He said: “This is a criminal with a stolen gun who tried to kill one of our officers. … It has nothing to do with being a Muslim or following the Islamic faith.” Read more in the links below.

Police: Suspect says he shot Philly cop ‘in the name of Islam’

VIDEO | Police: Suspect shot Philly officer in name of Islam

Texas trooper indicted with perjury in Sandra Bland case
A frame grab from the dashcam video showing trooper Brian Encinia arresting Sandra Bland on July 10, 2015. (Texas Department of Public Safety via AP)
A frame grab from the dashcam video showing trooper Brian Encinia arresting Sandra Bland on July 10, 2015. (Texas Department of Public Safety via AP)

A grand jury indicted state trooper Brian Encinia on perjury charges on Jan. 6. Encinia, who is white, had arrested Sandra Bland, a black woman, July 10 in Waller County, Texas, after a routine traffic stop escalated into a confrontation. Bland was found dead in her jail cell three days later. The death was ruled a suicide. The Texas Department of Public Safety said in a news release that it will begin the process of discharging the trooper from the department. Encinia faces a possible penalty of one year in jail on the misdemeanor charge and a $4,000 fine, prosecutors said. On Dec. 21, the grand jury decided no one would be charged in her death. Read below for more details.

Texas trooper indicted in Sandra Bland case faces dismissal

Grand jury indicts trooper in Sandra Bland case

VIDEO: Trooper indicted in Sandra Bland case

Texas Trooper Who Arrested Sandra Bland Is Indicted on Perjury Charge

Treat police-related killings as public health issue

FBI Director James Comey has said the lack of a reliable, official database with timely information about police killings is “unacceptable.” However, there is a way to count police-related deaths in closer to real time, researchers say. These deaths affect the well-being of families and communities. The information is important for public health, not only the criminal justice system. Treating law-enforcement related deaths as a “notifiable condition” would require public health officials to track the data in real time. Read more in the links below.

Wandering Eye: There aren’t solid stats on police killings. Researchers say there’s an easy fix

Police Killings and Police Deaths Are Public Health Data and Can Be Counted

Ex-cop charged in Walter Scott death released from jail
Former North Charleston police officer Michael Slager speaks during a hearing in Charleston, S.C., on Jan. 4, 2016 (Pool photo by Brad Nettles)
Former North Charleston officer Michael Slager speaks during a hearing in Charleston, S.C., on Jan. 4, 2016. (Pool photo by Brad Nettles)

A former South Carolina police officer charged with murder in the April death of an unarmed black man was freed on bond Jan. 4. A video from a bystander’s cellphone captured Michael Slager, who is white, shooting Walter Scott in the back after the motorist fled a traffic stop. The footage added to an ongoing national discussion about police treatment of black suspects. Slager’s trial has been delayed because prosecutor Scarlett Wilson is also handling the case of Dylann Roof, charged in the Charleston church shooting that left nine people dead, whose trial is scheduled for July. The judge reconsidered bail because of the delay and set Slager’s trial for Oct. 31. Read more about the developments in the links below.

Ex-cop in S.C. shooting of unarmed black motorist free on bond

VIDEO: Police officer who shot Walter Scott free on bond

VIDEO: S.C. dashcam video shows traffic stop before shooting

Family sues Baltimore police over suicide
A demonstrator is detained by Baltimore sheriff officers, outside of the courthouse after the mistrial of officer William Porter, one of six Baltimore city police officers charged in connection with the death of Freddie Gray. (Photo: Jose Luis Magana, AP)
A demonstrator is detained by Baltimore sheriff officers, outside of the courthouse after the mistrial of officer William Porter, one of six Baltimore city police officers charged in connection with the death of Freddie Gray. (Photo: Jose Luis Magana, AP)
Officer mistreatment drove man to take life, family says

The family of Jeffrey Blair, 35, a former IT worker, filed a lawsuit near the end of December against the Baltimore police department, Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, the city council, former police commissioner Anthony Batts and officer David Austin, among others, for more than $16 million.

Blair was pulled over during a traffic stop, and emerged from his vehicle with his hands up and empty, the family says. Officer Austin shot Blair four times in the arm, stomach and chest, according to the family who also says the police department refused to allow Blair contact with his wife and mother while he was being treated in the hospital for his injuries, ignored Blair’s lawyers and took Blair to central booking in a state of undress, according to a Baltimore Sun report. The family says police abuse drove Blair to commit suicide June 8 instead of going back to the hospital for more treatment. More information:

Baltimore Sun: Family alleges man’s suicide was the result of Baltimore police shooting, mistreatment

Grand jury declines criminal charges in death of Tamir Rice
Tamir Rice (Photo: Rice Family)
Tamir Rice (Photo: Rice Family)

A grand jury has decided not to criminally charge the officer responsible for the death of Tamir Rice, a 12-year-old Cleveland boy who was shot and killed when carrying an Airsoft gun that shoots plastic pellets more than 13 months ago. According to Timothy McGinty, prosecutor, the evidence “did not indicate criminal conduct,” by rookie officer Timothy Loehmann or his training officer Frank Garmback. More information below:

Grand jury: No charges in Tamir Rice killing

Two killed by Chicago cop
LaTonya Jones, the daughter of Bettie Jones who was killed by a Chicago officer, holds a picture of her mother during a vigil outside her home on Dec. 27. (Photo: Scott Olson, Getty Images)
LaTonya Jones, the daughter of Bettie Jones who was killed by a Chicago officer, holds a picture of her mother during a vigil outside her home on Dec. 27. (Photo: Scott Olson, Getty Images)
Officer was responding to domestic violence call

As the Department of Justice launched an investigation into the Chicago Police Department, another city officer was involved in a fatal shooting. At 4:30 a.m. Dec. 26, a Chicago officer was responding to a domestic violence dispute when he shot and killed Bettie R. Jones, 55, and Quintonio Legrier, 19. Both died at a nearby hospital.  Jones was shot accidentally, according to police.  The shooting is under review by the Independent Police Review Authority. For more information, see links below:

Chicago officer fatally shoots 2, including one by accident, in domestic call

GALLERY: Chicago police shooting vigil

Chicago officers fatally shoots 2, one deemed accident

#BLM activists demand justice for Jamar Clark
Police line up at the light rail stop for the Minneapolis-St. Paul International airport where #blacklivesmatter activists tried to enter on Dec. 23, 2015.(Photo: Stephen Maturen, Getty Images)
Police line up at the light rail stop for the Minneapolis-St. Paul International airport where #blacklivesmatter activists tried to enter on Dec. 23, 2015. (Photo: Stephen Maturen, Getty Images)

#Blacklivesmatter activists demonstrated at the Mall of America and the Minneapolis-St. Paul International airport on Dec. 23 to call attention to the death of Jamar Clark. He was shot by police who responded to a report of an assault on Nov. 15. The 24-year-old black man died the next day. Several hundred protesters disrupted one of the airport terminals for a couple of hours and blocked traffic in front of the airport. TV reporter Ben Garvin said at least two people were arrested at the terminal.

Earlier in the afternoon, protesters gathered at the Mall of America. Many chanted: “What do we want? Justice! When do we want it? Now!” Police directed people to leave the mall. From there, many took light rail to the airport. Read more about the demonstrations below.

Black Lives Matter protest snarls Minneapolis airport

VIDEO: Black Lives Matter shut down airport terminal

Philadelphia reduces officer-involved shootings

The Philadelphia Police Department has made progress in curbing deadly use of force, according to a Justice Department report released Dec. 22. The police department has been working to implement DOJ recommendations after a spike in police-involved shootings in 2013. That year, 11 people died in officer-related killings, while this year, there have only been two such fatalities. Commissioner Charles Ramsey credited improved training, and changes to use of force policies and investigation procedures for the department’s progress. Read more about what’s behind the improvements below.

Philadelphia Police Department makes rapid reforms: Report

Ramsey: Philly has made progress on officer-involved shootings

No charges in Sandra Bland’s death
Geneva Reed-Veal, from left, and Sharon Cooper, the mother and sister of Sandra Bland, listen to attorney Larry Rogers Jr. on Dec. 21, 2015, in Chicago. (Photo: Phil Velasquez, Chicago Tribune via AP)
Geneva Reed-Veal, from left, and Sharon Cooper, the mother and sister of Sandra Bland, listen to attorney Larry Rogers Jr. on Dec. 21, 2015, in Chicago. (Photo: Phil Velasquez, Chicago Tribune via AP)

A grand jury has decided no one will be charged in connection with Sandra Bland’s death in a Texas jailhouse this past July, a prosecutor said Dec. 21. Bland, who was arrested after a traffic stop July 10 in Waller County was found dead in her cell three days later. She apparently hanged herself. Bland, a black woman, was arrested by a white officer after the routine stop escalated into a confrontation. The grand jury will meet again in January to decide other aspects of the case, which is still open, prosecutor Darrell Jordan said. Read more in the links below.

No charges in Sandra Bland jailhouse death

VIDEO: Grand jury: No indictments in Sandra Bland’s death

Grand Jury Declines to Indict Anyone in Death of Sandra Bland

Freddie Gray family lawyer calls outcome ‘bump’ on road to justice
Protesters march through the streets after a mistrial was declared in the trial of Baltimore police officer William G. Porter. (Photo: Rob Carr, Getty Images)
Protesters march through the streets after a mistrial was declared in the trial of Baltimore police officer William G. Porter. (Photo: Rob Carr, Getty Images)

A judge has declared a hung jury for the first of six officers charged in the case of Freddie Gray, the young black man who died in April while in the custody of Baltimore police. “This is just a temporary bump on the road to justice,” said family lawyer William H. “Billy” Murphy. “It happens. It’s part of how the system works.” The officer, William Porter, will be retried on charges of manslaughter, assault, misconduct and reckless endangerment. More on the trial below:

Baltimore on edge after mistrial in first Freddie Gray case

What’s next in Freddie Gray case: Decision on retrial

VIDEO: Freddie Gray’s family urge calm after mistrial

Found guilty of 18 counts, Holtzclaw faces 263 years
People demonstrate outside the courthouse during the trial of Daniel Holtzclaw in Oklahoma City on Dec. 8, 2015. (Photo: Sue Ogrocki, AP)
People demonstrate outside the courthouse during the trial of Daniel Holtzclaw in Oklahoma City on Dec. 8, 2015. (Photo: Sue Ogrocki, AP)

Daniel Holtzclaw, a former Oklahoma City police officer, was found guilty on Dec. 10 of four charges of first-degree rape and 14 additional counts. All of the eight women connected to the 18 counts were black. Holtzclaw is half-white, half-Japanese. The jury recommended  a sentence of 263 years. Formal sentencing is slated for Jan. 21. The Associated Press reported on this case in its year-long investigation on sexual misconduct by law enforcement. It found that over six years, 1,000 officers lost their licenses because of sex crimes or other sexual misconduct.  Read more in the links below.

Victims describe assaults by convicted ex-Oklahoma City cop Daniel Holtzclaw

‘It’s a problem for the nation’: Former Okla. cop preyed on minority women

VIDEO: Okla. ex-cop guilty of rape in sex abuse case

Former Oklahoma City cop convicted on rape charges

Report raises concerns about unchecked police brutality

On Dec. 13, the The New York Times described the death in 2010 of Leonard Strickland, a prisoner who had schizophrenia, in the Clinton Correctional Facility in Dannemora, N.Y. A security video shows him handcuffed and being restrained by three officers. After several minutes, he falls to the floor. The officers then drag his unresponsive body into a hallway and into an elevator. They take him to the mental health ward. He is left lying on the floor for a few more minutes. Finally, he is given CPR and taken to a hospital where he is pronounced dead. The dozen officers and health staff involved in the case are either still working — at Clinton or other state prisons — or retired, according to the report.

Over the past year, The New York Times and The Marshall Project have reported on the lack of holding corrections officers in New York state prisons accountable, even when there is evidence of abuse. Read more in the links below.

An Inmate Dies, and No One Is Punished

Guarding the Prison Guards: New York State’s Troubled Disciplinary System

Emanuel vows to reform police department
Demonstrators march through downtown Chicago on Dec. 9, 2015. (Photo by Scott Olson, Getty Images)
Demonstrators march through downtown Chicago on Dec. 9, 2015. (Photo by Scott Olson, Getty Images)

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel apologized Dec. 9 for the city’s handling of the shooting death of Laquan McDonald, a black teenager killed by a white cop more than a year ago. He vowed “complete and total reform” of the police department, which he said had lost the public’s trust over decades. Since the video of the McDonald shooting was released, people have been calling for Emanuel and Cook County prosecutor Anita Alvarez to resign. Read more about developments in Chicago below.

Chicago Mayor Emanuel says he’s sorry about police shooting

Prosecutor: Video shows officer’s actions reasonable
This frame grab shows Ronald Johnson, right, running from police officers on Oct. 12, 2014. (Photo: Chicago Police Department via AP)
This frame grab shows Ronald Johnson, right, running from police officers on Oct. 12, 2014. (Photo: Chicago Police Department via AP)

A review of the shooting death of Ronald Johnson, 25, by detective George Hernandez concluded that Johnson had a gun when he ran away from police in October 2014, Cook County State’s Attorney Anita Alvarez said Dec. 7. The video supports Hernandez’s assertion that Johnson had a weapon, she said, and it could not be proven beyond a reasonable doubt that the officer’s actions were unjustified. Also, she rejected the claim by the attorney for Johnson’s family that a gun had been planted at the scene. Mayor Rahm Emanuel said Monday that an independent police review authority, under new leadership, would restart an investigation into the Johnson shooting. Read more about developments in Chicago below.

No charges in second Chicago police shooting

VIDEO: Police reports differ from Laquan McDonald shooting video

Justice Department launches Chicago police probe

PHOTO GALLERY: Protesters take to Chicago streets after video release

Parents file civil rights complaint in 32-year-old’s death
A police officer holds a Taser. (Photo: Rik Jesse, Florida Today)
A police officer holds a Taser. (Photo: Rik Jesse, Florida Today)

Parents of DeOntre L. Dorsey, who died following nearly nine months in a “semi-vegetative state” after being Tasered by police, filed a civil rights complaint with the Justice Department on Dec. 1. The family said Dorsey, 32, had suffered a seizure while driving and lost control of his car. The corporal with the Charles County, Md., sheriff’s office who responded to the accident said he hit Dorsey with a stun gun after he failed to comply with an order to put his hands behind his back. After Dorsey was restrained with handcuffs and leg shackles, he stopped breathing, according to a police report. He was given CPR and brought to the hospital, the report stated. A Washington Post report found nearly 55% of people who died in encounters with police using stun guns since January were minorities. Dorsey was black. For more details, view the link below.

Family asks for federal review of son’s death after Tasering

Footage shows cop fatally shooting black male, 25
Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel (Photo: M. Spencer Green, AP)
Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel (Photo: M. Spencer Green, AP)

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel says he will release the week of Dec. 7 another dashcam video that shows a black male being fatally shot by a Chicago Police Department officer. Ronald Johnson, 25, was shot by Detective George Hernandez, according to court documents, after attending a memorial service for a friend in October 2014. Police say Johnson pointed a gun at officers. The family’s attorney says the video shows Johnson running from police and that he had no weapon. This announcement comes after the controversial release of a dashcam video that shows Chicago officer Jason Van Dyke shooting and killing 17-year-old Laquan McDonald. For more information, see the links below:

Chicago to release police shooting video of Ronald Johnson

Emanuel shifts position, now ‘welcomes’ DOJ probe of Chicago police

Illinois AG asks Justice to probe Chicago cops

Police evict camp protesters

Officers of Minneapolis’ 4th Precinct handed out eviction notices and ordered protesters to leave after several weeks of demonstrations, stating that camp structures, which were set up near the precinct, impeded traffic. The protests began after an officer shot Jamar Clark during a Nov. 15 scuffle. The 24-year-old black male died the following day. For more, click below:

Minn. police clear shooting protest camp

Chicago mayor asked police chief McCarthy to resign Dec. 1
Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, left, and Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy at a news conference on Nov. 24, 2015, in Chicago. (Photo: Charles Rex Arbogast, AP)
Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, left, and Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy at a news conference on Nov. 24, 2015, in Chicago. (Photo: Charles Rex Arbogast, AP)

One week after the release of a video showing a white cop shooting a black teen 16 times, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel fired Chicago Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy. Emanuel said he formally asked for the chief’s resignation Dec. 1.  The footage of Laquan McDonald’s death prompted protests in the city and raised questions about why it took more than a year for the video to be made public. Read more about the developments below.

Chicago mayor fires police chief amidst protests over police shooting

Officer charged with murder in teen’s death released

Judge Donald Panarese Jr., set bail at $1.5 million for the white Chicago cop seen in a video shooting and killing black teenager Laquan McDonald. The dashcam video was made public Tuesday, Nov. 24, the day officer Jason Van Dyke originally appeared in court for his bond hearing. Panarese wanted to watch the video before setting bail for the officer who shot McDonald 16 times. After paying 10% of the bail, Van Dyke was released Nov. 30. For more information on this and other breaking stories related to the Chicago case, check the links below:

Chicago cop who fatally shot teen makes bail 

Burger King: Chicago shooting video altered

Protests mostly calm after footage of brutal killing made public 

Demonstrators in Chicago were angry but peaceful after the city publicly released the dashcam video showing an officer killing Laquan McDonald by shooting him 16 times. The incident took place Oct. 20, 2014. Officer Jason Van Dyke’s lawyer had said the policeman acted in self-defense and that McDonald lunged at his client. The video, below, shows McDonald walking away from the officers before he was shot.

WARNING: The following video contains graphic images.

Chicago cop indicted before video release
Diagram of bullet holes allegedly suffered by 17 year-old Laquan McDonald at the hands of Officer Jason Van Dyke. (Photo: Cook County Medical Examiner via epa)
Diagram of bullet holes allegedly suffered by 17-year-old Laquan McDonald at the hands of Officer Jason Van Dyke. (Photo: Cook County Medical Examiner via epa)

Officer Jason Van Dyke will be held without bail until at least Nov. 30, according to reports, for his role in the shooting death of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald. The white officer who was charged with first-degree murder on Tuesday, Nov. 24, shot McDonald, a black teen, 16 times. A judge ordered the release by Wednesday of a police dashcam video that is said to show the fatal shooting. Take a look at the links below for more information:

Chicago cop charged with murder for shooting black teen 16 times

VIDEO: Chicago cop charged with teen’s murder

Campus pumps up security after Ore. student attacked

The attack of a student at Portland’s Lewis & Clark College may have been related to threats against African-American students made on Yik Yak including one that used the hashtag #bringbackslavery, according to reports. The African-American student, 26, says he was assaulted on Friday night, Nov. 20. Bias crimes detectives are conducting the investigation. More information below:

Police: Ore. student attacked in possible hate crime

17-year-old Chicago male was shot 16 times, killed

The Chicago Police Department has until Wednesday to release the video, taken by a squad car dashcam, that is said to show a police officer fatally shooting Laquan McDonald. The teen had PCP in his system at the time of his death and officers said he was erratic during the Oct. 20, 2014, confrontation and was holding a knife. Witnesses say the teen was walking away from the officer when he was shot. More on the case below:

Chicago police to release video of officer shooting teen

Black man, 24, dies after police shooting
Demonstrators call for answers in the shooting of Jamar Clark in Minneapolis on Nov. 17, 2015. (Photo: Richard Tsong-Taatarii, Star Tribune via AP)
Demonstrators call for answers in the shooting of Jamar Clark in Minneapolis on Nov. 17, 2015. (Photo: Richard Tsong-Taatarii, Star Tribune via AP)

Despite protesters’ demands, videos showing the police shooting of Jamar Clark, a 24-year-old black man, on Nov. 15 won’t be released to the public, the state Bureau of Criminal Apprehension said Tuesday, Nov. 18. Clark died Monday evening after being taken off life support. He was shot following a scuffle with Minneapolis Police. In response to the shooting, hundreds of #blacklivesmatter protesters demonstrated in Minneapolis. The two officers involved in the incident remain on paid leave while an investigation continues. Read more updates below.

Minn. officials: Police shooting videos won’t be released

BCA: Video of Jamar Clark shooting doesn’t show everything

Minnesota agency investigates officers in altercation
Protesters marched to the Minneapolis 4th Precinct, the scene where a man was shot by a police officer early Sunday, Nov. 15.(Photo: Mark Vancleave, Star Tribune via AP)
Protesters marched to the Minneapolis 4th Precinct, the scene where a man was shot by a police officer early Sunday, Nov. 15. (Photo: Mark Vancleave, Star Tribune via AP)

Protesters from #blacklivesmatter and beyond confronted police at the entrance of Minneapolis’ 4th Precinct station on Nov. 15, and returned to the city the following day after a physical altercation with Minneapolis Police ended in the shooting of Jamar Clark, 24, a black male. The details of the altercation are unclear. Witnesses say Clark was handcuffed and that an officer put a knee in his back and shot him in the head, according to criminal justice chair for the Minneapolis NAACP, Jason Sole. Find out more about the investigation:

Protests erupt after black man shot by police in Minneapolis

VIDEO: Activists want release of police shooting video

Anger builds after police shoot assault suspect in Minneapolis

Tuscaloosa police under scrutiny
Tuscaloosa, Ala., police vehicle. (Photo: Jay Reeves, AP)
(Photo: Jay Reeves, AP)

After videos of a violent arrest of three University of Alabama students on Nov. 8. went viral, Tuscaloosa (Ala.) police officers James Kent, Phillip Champion and Gregory Pimm were placed on administrative leave the next day.

The officers, responding to a noise complaint, pulled two men and a woman out of an apartment. One student was hit with a stun gun, and another was beaten. This is the third incident since July drawing attention to Tuscaloosa police behavior. Read more about recent encounters in the links below.

Viral videos sting embattled Tuscaloosa police department

No wrongdoing by Tuscaloosa police in deaths of Anthony Ware, Jeffory Tevis, grand jury finds

Man fatally shot by Tuscaloosa police ID’d, had ‘mental episode’

Man dies after being pepper sprayed by police

Embezzlement, fear spurred officer to frame others
Fox Lake police Lt. Charles Joseph Gliniewicz had stolen thousands of dollars before he committed suicide on Sept. 1. (Photo: Lake County Sheriff's Department)
Fox Lake police Lt. Charles Joseph Gliniewicz had stolen thousands of dollars before he committed suicide on Sept. 1. (Photo: Lake County Sheriff’s Department)

The Illinois officer whose death had been investigated as a homicide, had stolen thousands of dollars from his police department, and the fear of getting caught pushed him to commit suicide, authorities said. Just before he killed himself, Lt. Charles Joseph Gliniewicz, 52, called his dispatch to report suspicious activity, stating that he was in pursuit of a black man and two white men. His Sept. 1 death was counted among many high-profile cases involving police officers that galvanized national backlash to the #blacklivesmatter movement. More on the latest findings in the links below.

Illinois police officers who spurred manhunt stole money, committed suicide

VIDEO: Officer whose death sparked manhunt committed suicide

After murder of Charles Gliniewicz & Darren Goforth, no more blue blood: Column

Deputy’s attorney: S.C. officer’s  ‘actions were justified’
Ben Fields (Photo: Richland County (S.C.) Sheriff's Department via AP)
Ben Fields (Photo: Richland County (S.C.) Sheriff’s Department via AP)

Spring Valley High School students walked out of classes on Oct. 30, 2015, in Columbia, S.C., to protest the firing of Deputy Ben Fields, who used force to remove a black, female student from a classroom. The girl had refused to put away her phone after multiple requests from the teacher. Videos that surfaced showed Fields grabbing the girl, throwing her to the ground and dragging her across the floor. Read more about the latest developments in the articles below.

Students walk out to support fired S.C. deputy

Fired S.C. deputy’s attorney: ‘Actions were justified’

Deputy in S.C. classroom arrest video fired

More violence linked to videos of police, FBI director says
FBI Director James Comey (Photo: Charles Rex Arbogast, AP)
James Comey (Photo: AP)

Viral videos involving police killings might be behind the increase in violent crimes in some cities, FBI Director James Comey recently stated. The so-called Ferguson effect, some say, has made officers less aggressive, which in turn encourages criminals. However, Comey said statistics don’t yet prove whether the Ferguson effect is taking place.

Read more about Comey’s comments and the view of USA TODAY’s Editorial Board.

FBI director links ‘viral videos’ of police to rise in violence

FBI chief jumps gun on ‘Ferguson effect’: Our view

Comey gives voice to cops’ concerns: Opposing view

Police deaths underrported

Although the FBI counted only 24 deaths of police in high-speed car chases since 1980, records show more than 370 killed during that time, according to a USA TODAY analysis. This discrepancy is another example of how difficult it is for the federal government to track violent deaths. Read more about the implications of the underreporting in USA TODAY’s article.

FBI vastly understates police deaths in chases

Tarantino marches against police brutality
Film director Quentin Tarantino demonstrates against police brutality on Oct. 24, 2015, in New York City. (Photo: AFP/Getty Images)
Film director Quentin Tarantino demonstrates against police brutality on Oct. 24, 2015, in New York City. (Photo: AFP/Getty Images)

Movie director Quentin Tarantino drew support and criticism for his remarks calling for justice for those killed by police. “If you believe there’s murder going on, then you need to rise up and stand up against it. I’m here to say I’m on the side of the murdered,” Tarantino said at a demonstration in New York City on Oct. 24.

Afterward, a New York police union urged a boycott of Tarantino’s movies. Read more in USA TODAY’s articles.

Quentin Tarantino, N.Y. cops beef over brutality

Jamie Foxx supports Tarantino: ‘Keep telling the truth’

Fla. man never fired weapon, attorney says
A demonstration for answers in the shooting death of church drummer Corey Jones outside the Palm Beach Gardens Police Department. (Photo: Carline Jean, South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)
A demonstration for answers in the shooting death of church drummer Corey Jones outside the Palm Beach Gardens Police Department. (Photo: Carline Jean, South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)

On Sunday, Oct. 18, in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla., a 31-year-old, black church drummer waited for assistance by his car, which had broken down on the road.  Moments later, he was shot and killed by a plainclothes policeman. What transpired between the two men is unclear. But new information shows that the drummer, Corey Jones, never fired his weapon, according to the Jones family attorney. More on the family’s demand for answers in this USA TODAY story.

Attorney: Corey Jones didn’t fire his gun

VIDEO: The shooting death of Corey Jones: What we know

Lawyer: Corey Jones likely died thinking he was being attacked

Houston’s Wilfork speaks out about Florida police shooting

VIDEO: Fla. shooting victim’s family: We need answers

Sun Sentinel on Corey Jones shooting

New York City police officer fatally shot
Randolph Holder (Photo: AP)
Randolph Holder (Photo: AP)

A New York City police officer was fatally shot Oct. 20 in East Harlem, officials said. Randolph Holder, 33, had responded to reports of gunfire and was hit in the head while pursuing a suspect.

The suspect was hit in the leg by Holder’s partner and taken into custody after being treated at the hospital. Holder, an immigrant from Guyana, was a five-year veteran of the police force, officials said. He became an officer in July 2010. Below, the latest story.

NYPD officer shot in head, killed during gun battle

Martese Johnson files lawsuit 
Martese Johnson (Photo: Andrew Shurtleff, AP)
Johnson (Photo: AP)

Martese Johnson, the University of Virginia student who was injured in a confrontation with police officers in March, has filed a $3 million federal civil rights lawsuit against the state Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control.

Video of the incident showing Johnson with a bloodied face went viral on social media and catapulted the 20-year-old into the middle of the #blacklivesmatter movement. Below find videos of Johnson talking about the confrontation and the latest news.

UVA student files $3M suit after bloody arrest

VIDEO: Martese Johnson: Police confrontation made me an activist

VIDEO: Martese Johnson: Police violence followed me from Chicago to U.Va.

Outside reviews: Killing of Tamir Rice, 12, justified
Tamir Rice
Tamir Rice (Family photo)

It will have been a year in November since a white police officer fatally shot Tamir Rice, a 12-year-old black boy who was holding a toy gun outside of a Cleveland recreation center. The shooting set off protests by #blacklivesmatter activists and a firestorm of response, most of it outrage, on Twitter. On Saturday, two outside reviews deemed the killing of the young boy by Timothy Loehmann, a patrolman, justified. The dispatcher who took the call resigned. She had described Rice as a “male” waving a gun, but neglected to state that the caller said the gun may have been fake. Below, the latest stories on the Rice case (check back for updates, which will be posted as they come in):

Reports find reasonable force used in Tamir Rice death

VIDEO: Tamir Rice family supporters: Police policing themselves

Police dispatcher in Tamir Rice case resigns

Police officer shot, killed

Terence Olridge, 31, is the second Memphis police officer shot and killed in the city in the past 10 weeks, according to a USA TODAY report. The officer, who was shot multiple times on Sunday, had only been on the force for a little over a year, joining in September 2014.  Below, the latest on the Olridge case:

Memphis police officer shot, killed

VIDEO: Memphis police officer shot and killed

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Report: Freddie Gray’s mother attempted suicide

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Suspect arrested after police officer shot in N.M.

‘Blue Lives Matter’ billboards pop up across USA, stir controversy

Relatives of Black Man Shot by Off-Duty Officer in Texas Question Police Actions

Police officer shot and killed at South Carolina mall